A significant part of the Hebrew Scriptures

A significant part of the Hebrew Scriptures

Without a doubt, a significant part of the Hebrew Scriptures appears to rotate around the subject of departure from the city and back to a connected, ancestral presence. This is found in Samuel’s advance notice to Israelites before they wandered into nationhood under Saul’s authority (Samuel 8:10-18). It is found in the episode on the development of the Pinnacle of Babel (Beginning 11:6-7) by which God, evidently doubtful about the endeavor into building innovation (and symbol ism) intrinsic in metropolitan life viewed the pinnacle and afterward made disarray among individuals by stirring up their dialects and keeping them from speaking with each other – in this way separating the coordinated gathering and apparently dividing them into discrete clans. In Genesis 19:24, God demonstrated this by turning Lot’s wife into a salt pillar so that she could look back at Gomorrah while the city was on fire. In the story of Noah’s Ark, in Genesis 6:7, God orders Noah to build the ark as a kind of tribal retreat to protect him from the great flood because “earth’s population had begun to multiply” and because “mankind had become wicked.” This is perhaps the most explicit reference to it. That tale’s symbolism seems fairly obvious. God maintained that His picked individuals should stay picked as well as in a natural setting, socially, hereditarily exceptional and withdrew from the transgressions of the city.

The God idea conveyed in the Hebrew Scriptures didn’t lean toward innovation or whatever might be understood as pre-science. One might wonder why he seemed to be against Adam and Eve learning more in Eden.

It is conceivable this implied that innovation – while not corrupt in itself was contradictory with the little ancestral, related migrant way of life. In a meandering clan there is no huge measure of innovation. Voyaging ceaselessly blocked migrants from setting up enormous structures or builds of any kind. One can’t convey a ziggurat or pyramid from one spot to another.