IBM, II. How He Helped Hitler in World War II

IBM, II. How He Helped Hitler in World War II

An advertisement promoting IBM technology to Nazi Germany reads, “See everything with Hermann’s Hollerith punch card.” This article examines the strategy of the American-owned IBM (then punch card manufacturer) in Nazi Germany before 1937. Edwin Black sued Thomas J. Watson, who was director of IBM from 1915 to 1956, and other senior IBM executives in New York, deliberately allowed the Third Reich to use IBM technology to protect IBM’s profits.

As Edwin Blake said, even if Hollerith’s paper punching and counting machine was loaned to the Nazi government by its German counterpart, the Holocaust would still occur. But with the help of more than a hundred researchers from archives in the United States, Great Britain, Germany, France and Israel, Edwin Blake gathered the missing information believed among the country’s most powerful corporations and the Third Reich, the work was expanded. for business. worldwide during the war. Recently discovered Nazi documents and Polish witnesses clearly show that IBM’s collaboration with Nazi Germany went far beyond the German company.

Shortly after Hitler came to power, Nazi Germany became the most important player outside the United States. IBM’s German company Deutsche Hollerith Machine Gesellschaft is abbreviated Dehomag. America’s most powerful company continued to be based in Nazi-occupied Poland, but now through its New York-based private company Watson Business Machines, it most recently remained at the Kruetz 23 building in Warsaw. This private new company was founded by IBM New York to provide valuable services to Nazi Germany’s looting and ethnic cleansing programs after the invasion of Poland.

As part of this joint effort, the nation’s most powerful companies and the Nazis jointly designed and developed IBM solutions that accelerated Hitler and, in many ways, automated the significance of Hitler’s persecution of the Jews from the very beginning. identity and social exclusion for detention and isolation, deportation and finally extermination. Of course, the dynamics and context of corporate America’s relationship with empire changed during the Holocaust… no doubt about it. An American company refused to respond to allegations that IBM deliberately enacted Adolf Hitler’s torture and murder of Europeans, first published simultaneously in 40 countries on February 11, 2001, directly from New York City and through its international organisations. Germany dominates Europe supported by Swiss activities.