Seven Luminous Paths

Seven Luminous Paths

Interview with @chameleoninhighheels by Carola Kolbeck Our most recent poetry collection, “Seven Luminous Paths,” is written by Tom Rubens. It is a philosophical journey through a variety of topics, such as history, human actions, connections, and nature. Rubens’ back inventory remembers eight books for Reasoning, a determination of sonnets as well as three books. Rubens is an active and engaged citizen who is involved in both his political and local communities. This involvement has a significant impact on this collection and is made clear to the reader from the very first poem. His elaborate and semantic abilities are testing the standard, as well as the brain of the peruser. Straightforwardness isn’t his style, welcoming us into a rich and brilliant world that difficulties and illuminates our faculties. We examined a few of Rubens’ poems, delves deeper into philosophical poetry, and offered some advice on reading poetry in our previous blog post. Artists like Rubens have a happy audience because poetry, which has had a rough time in the past, appears to be making a comeback. We spoke with Tom Rubens about everything poetry and writing, including his writing process, sources of inspiration, and preferred writing style, as part of the launch of “Seven Luminous Paths.” We appreciate you speaking with us about your new book and congratulate you on its release, Tom. Your body of work is extensive and covers a wide range of genres. In light of this most recent collection of poems, how has your writing developed or changed in comparison to the poems you had previously published? My previous selection, The Deepening Foreground, was published fifteen years ago and had only 35 pages. As a result, it was less ambitious than Seven Luminous Paths. I have written significantly more and on a broader range of topics since then. Additionally, my language skills have improved in a variety of ways. Did the request for sonnets in Seven Glowing Ways work out easily, or were there certain quandaries you confronted? Actually, the order came from my editor at Happy London Press, Clare Newton, who suggested that I divide the content into theme-sections, which I hadn’t thought of before but immediately thought was a great idea. Your poems are intricate and detailed, and they also create beautiful mental images for the reader. Which sonnet in Seven Radiant Ways was the most challenging for you to compose – and why? By and large, I think it was ‘Swarmed Do,’ which is truth be told the longest sonnet in the book. My emotional attachment to the subject matter and the amount of information I needed to provide to establish various time frames contributed to the difficulties. Do you have any poems that were not included in the final selection? Which poems did you choose to include? Memory-Minings and Other Probes is a second collection of roughly equal number of poems that I will include in accordance with an agreement with Happy London Press. Yet, having said this, I sincerely can’t remember the elements which drove me to my selection of sonnets for Seven Radiant Ways. A significant number of your sonnets are about places in the UK. Are the poems something you wrote while you were there, or did you just get the idea after you went? a little of each. I was definitely moved by what I saw on the spot, and I was already coming up with some of the diction that would later be used in the poems. However, later, truth be told, my considerations extended significantly more, and the principal body of the sonnet came to fruition. What role does nature play in your poetry writing process? If you mean natural forces and phenomena, then this influence is particularly clear in the ‘Powers Not Our own’s segment of the book. Due to the fact that so many of the poems resonate with readers, it can be challenging to choose one. In the event that I needed to pick one, which is your #1 sonnet in Seven Brilliant Ways, and why? I don’t really have a favorite poem. However, there are a few poems in which certain sections provide me with a profound sense of aesthetic satisfaction. Let’s talk about how you write. What is your preferred method for jotting down ideas? My favored way is quickly looking for words and expressions which pass the idea and feeling hitting on me. By doing this, I try to keep the thought or feeling from slipping away, which is easy to do. That’s something that I think many of our writers can relate to. Do you write your poems in snippets and at various stages when inspiration strikes? Or do you write them all at once? Although I usually write poems slowly, I try to finish them in one sitting, even if the sitting is long. However, there are times when just one sitting isn’t enough, so I try to finish it in a second session. I rarely go any further than this because I want to keep the emotions that started it all, and I can’t do that for a very long time. Do you edit as you write, or do you start with drafts and edit later? As I stated in response to Question 10, I do a little bit of both, with editing as I go along taking center stage. Where would you prefer to write? Noisy? All out quiet? Activated or off? either complete silence or music of my choosing as the only sound.