Superheroes are no longer entertaining

Superheroes are no longer entertaining

No longer are superheroes entertaining. One would be completely willing to believe everything they were seeing in the She-Hulk: Attorney at Law trailer. Maybe a sensual scene between two lovers that is overly glorified, great special effects, or less attention paid to fan service than just a sequel to 2008’s Incredible Hulk. Marvel’s movie trailers have an unheard-of way of connecting with everyone on the planet and showing you something they are sure you really want to see. Then, as the groundbreaking Marvel book comes out, they have to hype themselves up during the wait to focus as much attention as they can on something. Before we get into this, the testimony of a person who has chosen to remain anonymous reveals that the relationship they had with superheroes did not necessarily begin with Disney+. They met for the first time in Captain America: The First Avenger, which came out in early 2019. They had no prior knowledge of the comic book mythology surrounding any superhero when they first started watching this amazing story. They believed that the only thing that set Superman apart from other superheroes was the fact that he was created first and was “more popular,” whereas Spider-Man and Batman lacked powers for the very reason that they were original. As a result, they were naturally taken aback when the anticipated superhero action did not begin until about the third quarter of the two-hour WWII film. He was essentially an enhanced human being who fought a tyrannical Palpatine-style hothead known as the Red Skull and flung a shield like a Frisbee disk rather than a superhuman hero who flew and had cool abilities. Power or even much action did not matter. It was about courage, sentimentality, and modesty. They enjoyed the movie. They would adore it even more when they realized that the incredible shared world aesthetic of the MCU was the reason why it seemed to attract more attention than any other franchise. Putting Iron Man and Captain America together was like putting John Wick and James Bond in the same universe, as well as Gandalf the Grey as a whole; in a nutshell, it was doing something that so many other businesses seemed unable to do. As a result of the MCU’s innumerable heroes, more and more of them began to appear in subsequent films. But after Endgame, this person decided to start looking at comic books for more and more possible predictions about how the Marvel universe would continue to work. It turned out that the majority of the characters in comic books were very different from their idealized heroes. This individual perceived Wanda as merely a lost child in need of a hug; her fate was that of a wicked witch who could cartoon-bend reality in the most unappealing of ways, as the sequel to Doctor Strange 2022 repeatedly demonstrated. Spider-Man, who at one point had been the favorite hero of this big brass band, was now taking other versions of Spider-Men, like the old favorites Tobey Maguire, and turning them into his team members, for no other reason than that he somehow has more experience as a Spider-Man than the other two combined, after they fought universe-sized villains like Sandman or Electro. Characters like Hulk were downsized and no longer their iconic, heroic alter egos. The fact that Marvel’s heroes were solely pricks with no benefits was the thing that most disappointed this person. The problem was that the most irritating aspects of Marvel’s comics were being incorporated into movies and television shows, whereas the benefits, such as sexual intimacy and actually exciting fight scenes, appeared to be appearing less and less. This individual’s prior perception of superheroes was lighthearted and humorous—not in the lazy, childish sense that the MCU introduced, but rather as noble, righteous, humble, and caring individuals like a church pastor. At first, it seemed like this universe’s extremes were serious nobility and sacrifice or just fun-loving, eye-pleasing entertainment. By the time WandaVision scrolled into post-pandemic 2021, they realized how sinister, eerie, and out of the ordinary these characters really were. They ended the show in the middle of it, and they never made it to the ninth episode. This might appear to be an issue of bias, however when the individual got back to superheroes in 2022, and started shedding simply the slightest bit of similar expectation they communicated previously, all they deteriorated than previously. According to their testimony, Marvel’s ability to depict an evil Doctor Strange rising from the dead, a bloody mess of the Illuminati, and lesbian mothers but not Wanda’s actual heroism after her obvious mistakes at Westview, some depictions of more classic heroes based on Marvel’s high budget and surprise elements, or possibly a sexually exciting scene from the most recent icon, She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, was an absolute shameless and cruel irony. These individuals returned to the MCU expecting epic surprises or on-screen pleasure; instead, they received nothing but the worst films possible. The individual started watching superhero movies to see amazing special effects, superheroes lifting huge vehicles or buildings, and people being saved from impossible disasters. It was never at any point about whether these characters were intended to be ‘reasonable’. Since then, this individual has stopped watching live-action superhero movies. With the exception of the children’s versions of these brightly colored but darkly filled prodigies, this was their second decision to end all superhero lore. Can it be otherwise stated that fans of superheroes do not comprehend the true purpose of entertainment? Either that, or they were aware of the situation and are working to change people’s minds or risk missing out on a cool fan gathering. The MCU isn’t the main profound disappointment in theaters or the cinema. Except for the blatant viewpoints of its inconsistent directors, the DC Extended Universe represents nothing. Because organization would destroy their aesthetic and iconography, DC Comics cannot create a cinematic universe. Amazon’s Invincible and The Boys are not suitable for children or those with a weak stomach because they openly depict bloody violence and bodily harm that even DC couldn’t handle. Additionally, Marvel was intended to target those shows’ perks, albeit without the positive aspects. Escape was, is, and always will be the goal of entertainment. The definition of escape does not include examining our current society and incorporating its controversy into a fictional series in order to “see struggles through other’s eyes.” People don’t go to the movies for the politics, they don’t go to the movies so they can be reminded of the problems they face every day, and they don’t go to the movies so they can actually find themselves in characters who outperform people. When people go to the movies, they don’t want violence, drama, or any other kind of material for the MCU. Escape is when you can see things that can’t happen in real life and escape Earth-bound logic. As a public domain concept, toys magically coming to life and running across the screen in places we can’t fit may sound boring, but that’s exactly why Toy Story is so popular. People just want to see the cool effects and the funny characters, not the superheroes, which is why Big Hero 6 was so successful. Despite the fact that it has been scientifically established that WALL-E will not take place in the year 2810, audiences continue to watch it for the thrill of witnessing the robot escape into space. Worries are not the focus of movies; rather, they are forgotten. hakuna matata, which translates to “no worries” in Swahili, is the movie’s catchphrase. So why does the MCU continue to air despite numerous criticisms and debates? because of hard, cold money. For what reason would they say they are as yet rich? because people can’t get enough of the cool animated characters that people who don’t know how to draw can’t see. There would be no James Cameron film that could attract more attention if Pixar created a cinematic universe. However, Pixar prefers to separate their concepts due to their lack of concern for financial gain. “It’s about making people happy,” said Pixar’s linchpin John Lasseter. That is no longer what superheroes do. Cinematic universes focus not on people’s smiles but on the money they have in their pockets. They know how to make a movie look good, but they waste that technology on characters that have been around for a long time before Kevin Feige was born. Superheroes have evolved from amusing milestones of amusement to radical occultists who demonstrate that being a human is a terrible thing. It’s about trying to control their audience, literally hypnotizing them into submission, and giving punishment while withholding rewards in the hope that the rewards will heal.